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Baked Fish

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Salmon    Tuna    Mackerel    Cod    Halibut    Perch    Flounder    Smelts    Rock Fish    Shad

Turbot    Trout    Herring    Eel    Haddock    Shad Roe    Bluefish    Finnan Haddie    Salt Fish

Good-sized , that is, weighing 4 or 5 pounds, are usually . When prepared by this method, fish are very satisfactory if they are spread out on a pan, flesh side up, and in a very hot oven with sufficient fat to flavor them well. A fish of large size, however, is especially delicious if its cavity is filled with a stuffing before it is .

When a fish is to be stuffed, any desired stuffing is prepared and then filled into the fish. With the cavity well filled, the edges of the fish are drawn together over the stuffing and sewed with a coarse needle and thread.

Whether the fish is stuffed or not, the same principles apply in its baking as apply in the roasting of meat; that is, the heat of a quick, hot oven sears the flesh, keeps in the juices, and prevents the loss of flavor, while that of a slow oven causes the loss of much of the flavor and moisture and produces a less tender dish. Often, in the baking of fish, it is necessary to add fat. This may be done by putting fat of some kind into the pan with the fish.

BAKED HADDOCK.
As haddock is a good-sized fish, it is an especially suitable one for baking. However, it is a dry fish, so fat should be added to it to improve its flavor. When haddock is to be baked, select a 4 or 5-pound fish, clean it thoroughly, boning it if desired, and sprinkle it inside and out with salt. Fill the cavity with any desired stuffing and sew up. Place in a dripping pan, and add some fat or place several slices of high fat meat around it. Bake in a hot oven for about 1 hour. After it has been in the oven for about 15 minutes, baste with the fat that will be found in the bottom of the pan and continue to baste every 10 minutes until the fish is done. Remove from the pan to a platter, garnish with parsley and slices of meat, and serve with any desired sauce.

BAKED HALIBUT.
Because of its size, halibut is cut into slices and sold in the form of steaks. Halibut slices are
often sauted, but they make a delicious dish when baked with tomatoes and flavoured with
onion, lemon, and bay leaf.
2 c. tomatoes, Few slices onion, 1 bay leaf, 1 tsp. salt, 1/8 tsp. pepper, 2 thin slices bacon, 1 Tb. flour, 2 lb. halibut steak

Heat the tomatoes, onion, and bay leaf in water. Add the salt and pepper and cook for a few minutes. Cut the bacon into small squares, try it out in a pan, and into this fat stir the flour. Pour this into the hot mixture, remove the bay leaf, and cook until the mixture thickens. Put the steaks into a baking dish, pour the sauce over them, and bake in a slow oven for about 45 minutes. Remove with the sauce to a hot platter and serve.

BAKED SALMON TROUT.
This deliciously flavoured game-fish is baked precisely as shad or white fish, but should be accompanied with cream gravy to make it perfect. It should be baked slowly, basting often with butter and water. When done have ready in a saucepan a cup of cream, diluted with a few spoonfuls of hot water, for fear it might clot in heating, in which have been stirred cautiously two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a scant tablespoonful of flour, and a little chopped parsley. Heat this in a vessel set within another of boiling water, add the gravy from the dripping-pan, boil up once to thicken, and when the trout is laid on a suitable hot dish, pour this sauce around it. Garnish with sprigs of parsley.

BAKED SALMON WHOLE
Having cleaned a small or moderate sized salmon, season it with salt, pepper, and powdered mace rubbed on it both outside and in. Skewer it with the tail turned round and put to the mouth. Lay it on a stand or trivet in a deep dish or pan, and stick it over with bits of butter rolled in flour. Put it into the oven, and baste it occasionally, while baking, with its own drippings. Garnish it with horseradish and sprigs of curled parsley, laid alternately round the edge of the dish; and send to table with it a small tureen of lobster sauce.

BAKED BLUEFISH
Take 2 lb Bluefish fillets, 1/2 c. Milk, 1 c. Bread crumbs, 1/4 lb Butter, 2 tb Lemon juice, 1/2, c Seafood seasoning, Salt and pepper to taste. Preheat the oven to 450°. Dip fish in milk; sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. Coat fish with the bread crumbs. Place 1/2 table-spoon butter on each fillet; sprinkle with lemon juice and fish seasoning. Place fish in well buttered baking pan. Bake for ten to fifteen minutes.

BAKED FILLETS OF WHITEFISH.
When whitefish of medium size can be secured, it is very often stuffed and baked whole, but variety can be had by cutting it into fillets before baking it. Besides producing a delicious dish, this method of preparation eliminates carving at the table, for the pieces can be cut the desired size for serving.

Prepare fillets of whitefish according to the directions given for filleting fish. Sprinkle each one with salt and pepper, and dip it first into beaten egg and then into bread crumbs. Brown some butter in a pan, place the fish into it, and set the pan in a hot oven. Bake until the fillets are a light brown, or about 30 minutes. Remove to a hot dish, garnish with parsley and serve with any desired sauce.

BAKED FINNAN HADDIE.
When haddock is cured by smoking, it is known as ‘finnan haddie’. As fish of this kind has considerable thick flesh, it is very good for baking. Other methods of cookery may, of course, be applied to it, but none is more satisfactory than baking. To bake a finnan haddie, wash it in warm water and put it to soak in fresh warm water. After it has soaked for 1/2 hour, allow it to come gradually to nearly the boiling point and then pour off the water. Place the fish in a baking pan, add a piece of butter, sprinkle with pepper, and pour a little water over it. Bake in a hot oven until it is nicely browned. Serve hot.

BAKED ROCK FISH.
Rub the fish with salt, black pepper, and a dust of cayenne, inside and out; prepare a stuffing of bread and butter, seasoned with pepper, salt, parsley and thyme; mix an egg in it, fill the fish with this, and sew it up or tie a string round it; put it in a deep pan, or oval oven and bake it as you would a fowl. To a large fish add half a pint of water; you can add more for the gravy if necessary; dust flour over and baste it with butter. Any other fresh fish can be baked in the same way. A large one will bake slowly in an hour and a half, small ones in half an hour.

All Fish Cooking Method Recipes For:

Boiled Fish    Broiled Fish    Baked Fish    Sauted Fish    Stewed Fish   Creamed Fish

Fish Salad    Fried Fish    Fish Soup   Fish Chowder    Fish Balls    Fish Sauces    Fish Stuffings

Fish Dressings    Fish Tartre    Fish Au Gratin    Planked Fish    Pan Fish    Fish Croquettes

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